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#1 Community Manager

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Posted 01 September 2014 - 01:26 PM

Dear forum friends,

 

We decided to open a new topic called Military news. Here we would like to publish interesting news related to military issues, current war missions, conflicts and etc. With this topic we would like to invite you to share with us anything you consider important or just interesting in this area.

 

Your comments are more than welcome.

 

Our first news comes from the military news site called: militarytimes.com

 

Research raises concerns for new Army helmet design

 

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Tests by Navy researchers on a new Army and Marine helmet design, complete with a visor and a jaw protector, showed blast waves could bounce off the added components and produce unexpected pressure, according to a recent research paper.

The Conformal Integrated Protective Headgear System, or CIPHER, prototype came under attack from all sides during the test, conducted by the Naval Research Laboratory, and in all configurations: Helmet only, helmet and visor, helmet and jaw protection, and the full-face coverage of visor and jaw protector.

The findings showed that adding face protection didn’t necessarily mean lessening blast-wave impact. For example, according to the report:

In a front-facing blast, pressures on the forehead were higher with the jaw protector, or mandible, in place and with the mandible-visor combination than they were with the helmet alone.

Wearing just the jaw protection for a front-facing blast doubled the strength of the secondary shockwave pressure on the forehead from 2 atmospheres (one atmosphere is a little less than 15 pounds per square inch) to 4 atmospheres.

In a rear-facing blast, pressures on the forehead were more than twice as high for the mandible-visor combination than for the helmet alone.

The tests could help designers mitigate the pressure increases with slight structural changes to the helmet, according to the study’s lead researcher. But there is no clear target.

“The military actually has specific criteria that helmets have to meet to be certified for use in ballistic and blunt force,” said David Mott, an NRL aerospace engineer. “No such criteria exists for pressure because the medical community is still working on what the injury mechanisms are, and we don’t know where to set those desirable levels anyway, at this point.”

Follow the bouncing wave

The tests centered on the helmet’s “suspension geometry,” the scientific term for what’s between the wearer’s head and the outer shell.

“You need that standoff for that blunt-impact and ballistic-impact protection ... that’s the way the helmets work,” Mott said. “We had seen that blast waves can infiltrate that gap.”

The visor and the mandible may blunt the initial blast, but they can also channel ricocheting blast waves into unexpected spaces around the wearer’s head. For example, according to the report, the mandible may “trap” a blast wave ricocheting from the wearer’s chest, which could then combine with the initial “incident wave” and lead to a “delayed, stronger forehead peak.”

The study recorded a forehead pressure of just over 9 atmospheres in a front-facing blast with the visor and mandible in place; the top pressure was just above 8 atmospheres in the helmet-only test.

The paper points out that increased pressures in one area generally come with decreased pressures in others. In the front-blast test, the visor-mandible combo dropped the peak of the highest-pressure wave on the back of the head by half when compared with the helmet-only setup, for instance.

It’s one of a series of tradeoffs designers must make, Mott said — determining which areas to channel blasts away from, and balancing the need for blast-wave protection against other concerns: A soldier may want to wear the mandible or visor, even with elevated blast-wave pressures in some areas, to keep a bomb fragment from bouncing off his face.



#2 Parker203

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Posted 01 September 2014 - 01:43 PM

The UK terror threat is now severe meaning very likley of a terrorist attack, because of British ISIS members may be coming back and bringing terrorism with them.

 

It isn't really military news, but we need more military personnel, as the cuts and slashed our military nearly in half


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#3 Parker203

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Posted 01 September 2014 - 01:53 PM

Dear forum friends,

 

We decided to open a new topic called Military news. Here we would like to publish interesting news related to military issues, current war missions, conflicts and etc. With this topic we would like to invite you to share with us anything you consider important or just interesting in this area.

 

Your comments are more than welcome.

 

Our first news comes from the military news site called: militarytimes.com

 

Research raises concerns for new Army helmet design

 

bilde.jpg

How can you move with that helmet! I mean, if you were in CQC, you would be at a serious disadvantage. It looks horrible!


Student, no money, no experience in making games, PHD at nothing

#4 Zandatsu

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Posted 01 September 2014 - 04:39 PM

It looks like a Motorbike Helmet...

 

In other news Germany has sent actual military equipment to the Kurdish fighters in Iraq, this includes over 15,000 G36's, 10,000 grenades, several hundred MILAN ATGM launchers and way more rockets. lots of light military vehicles and several hundred PZF 3's. Meanwhile only 8 out of Germany's 100's of Eurofighters are fit for service, great job German Government.

 

@Parker: I think an attack on any western nation is unlikely but I'm glad the government is doing something about it. Also the UK military no pretty much everyone's in Europe's has gone down the shitter, UK is being cut down bit by bit and is replacing equipment for no reason without replacements. The German military has become nothing more than a arms expo show off. France isn't doing so good but I do not much more than that. despite fighting in the war on terror and with Russia getting over confident in Ukraine NOW would be a pretty good time to re arm.


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#5 pkozukova

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Posted 01 September 2014 - 05:00 PM

How can you move with that helmet! I mean, if you were in CQC, you would be at a serious disadvantage. It looks horrible!


Sometimes the modern technology makes strange things and solutions :)

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Posted 08 September 2014 - 12:46 PM

USS Saratoga carrier heads off to be scrapped

 

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The decommissioned aircraft carrier USS Saratoga left its port in Rhode Island on Thursday for its final journey to Texas, where it will be scrapped.

The ship departed Naval Station Newport and made its way down Narragansett Bay to the Atlantic Ocean. It is heading to the Esco Marine ship recycling plant in Brownsville, Texas. The Saratoga was supposed to leave Wednesday, but the voyage was postponed because of concern that storms were developing along the route.

Esco Marine is being paid a penny by the Navy to dispose of the Saratoga. It plans to make money by selling what it recovers from the ship.

"It's a sad day in a way to see a great lady finish her career by being towed off to be scrapped," said Bill Sheridan, who was involved in the effort to try to save the ship by turning it into a museum.

Tugs arrived at the station at about 6 a.m. Thursday and the lines that had held the carrier to the pier for 16 years were cut. The carrier passed under Newport's Claiborne Pell Bridge and by Fort Adams at midmorning, where people had gathered to watch it go. The trip is expected to take about 16 days.

More than 100 veterans from all eras of the carrier's life took part in a farewell ceremony at the naval station earlier this month. They walked along the pier, taking pictures and looking up at the Saratoga one last time.

The Saratoga — named for the decisive battle of the American Revolution fought in upstate New York — was commissioned in 1956 and completed 22 deployments before it was decommissioned in 1994. It was off the coast of Cuba during the Cuban Missile Crisis, off of Vietnam during the Vietnam War and in the Persian Gulf during the first Iraq War. It arrived in Newport in 1998 and fell into disrepair.

The Navy took the Saratoga off the donation list in 2010 after another carrier, the USS John F. Kennedy, became available for a museum. There are plans for a memorial to the Saratoga on board the future Kennedy museum.

The Saratoga, Sheridan said, is "gone but not forgotten, and always remembered in our hearts."



#7 Zandatsu

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Posted 08 September 2014 - 03:46 PM

Its always sad to see a ship sail off to its death (RIP USS Saratoga)

 

However in other carrier news HMS Prince of Wales will be commissioned instead of being in "extended readiness."

http://www.dailymail...y-spending.html


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#8 pkozukova

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Posted 18 September 2014 - 12:43 PM

Air Force Thunderbirds, combat aircraft to fly again

Grounded since April because of budget cuts, many of the Air Force's combat aircraft started flying again Monday, the military has announced.

The grounding affected about one-third of active-duty combat craft, including squadrons of fighters, bombers, and airborne warning and control craft.

Officials at Air Combat Command at Joint Base Langley-Eustis in Virginia said the order affects planes in the U.S., Europe and the Pacific.

 

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"Since April we've been in a precipitous decline with regard to combat readiness," Gen. Mike Hostage, commander of Air Combat Command, said in a statement. "Returning to flying is an important first step but what we have ahead of us is a measured climb to recovery."

The Air Force has said it generally takes 60 to 90 days to conduct the training needed to return aircrews to mission-ready status. For the past several months, many pilots have been using simulators to try to keep their skills sharp.

The popular Thunderbirds demonstration team comprised of F-16s also will resume training flights, but all 2013 shows will remain canceled, said Lt. Col. Tadd Sholtis, an Air Combat Command spokesman.

The ability for the Air Force to get its planes airborne again comes after the Defense Department was authorized by Congress to shift about $7.5 billion from lower priority accounts to more vital operations. The Air Force said the restored flying hours represent about $208 million of that allocation authorized by Congress. In part, that funding comes reducing spending on modernizing the fleet.

Some Republicans applauded the move by the Air Force while accusing the president of playing politics with the defense budget.

"If recent reprogramming measures can put our pilots back in the air, I fully expect the Air Force can also find a way to also end furloughs for this fiscal year," U.S. Sen. Jim Inhofe, R-Okla., said in a statement. "Today's announcement proves the military's pain from sequester could have been mitigated all along had my bill to give flexibility to the Department of Defense been rightfully considered."

The restoration of flying hours will last through Oct. 1, when the new federal budget year begins.

"This decision gets us through the next several months but not the next several years," Hostage said. "Budget uncertainly makes it difficult to determine whether we'll be able to sustain a fully combat-ready force."



#9 Darth Vader

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Posted 20 September 2014 - 04:56 PM

The UK terror threat is now severe meaning very likley of a terrorist attack, because of British ISIS members may be coming back and bringing terrorism with them.

 

It isn't really military news, but we need more military personnel, as the cuts and slashed our military nearly in half

To combat terrorism in your territory, you need police, special police(if you have one) and anti-terrorist group(special police branch). If you use army to combat armed groups on your territory that mean you are in civil war(laws says that).

 

UK doesnt need much infantry, tanks or helicopters. But UK need destroyers, submarines and fighters. I wouldnt use much ships, just coastal guard and light corvettes, but i would focus spending on Air Force, because no one will invade UK, while UK can support other NATO countries with its air force only.


The truth is only point of view. It all depends on your point of view. Try to get a better understanding of things before you make your judgement.

#10 Darth Vader

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Posted 20 September 2014 - 05:07 PM

It looks like a Motorbike Helmet...

 

In other news Germany has sent actual military equipment to the Kurdish fighters in Iraq, this includes over 15,000 G36's, 10,000 grenades, several hundred MILAN ATGM launchers and way more rockets. lots of light military vehicles and several hundred PZF 3's. Meanwhile only 8 out of Germany's 100's of Eurofighters are fit for service, great job German Government.

 

@Parker: I think an attack on any western nation is unlikely but I'm glad the government is doing something about it. Also the UK military no pretty much everyone's in Europe's has gone down the shitter, UK is being cut down bit by bit and is replacing equipment for no reason without replacements. The German military has become nothing more than a arms expo show off. France isn't doing so good but I do not much more than that. despite fighting in the war on terror and with Russia getting over confident in Ukraine NOW would be a pretty good time to re arm.

 

One german, friend of mine just returned from 1 year service in 'Heer' and he complained to me that German Army today is nothing more than a 'feminist family'. He was listening stories about german iron armies from the past, his grandfather died in Crimea while invading Soviet Union. He expected tough men in the army, training, learning about weapons and all that, but he blame female minister of defence of Germany, he say she made the army 'soft family'.

 

And i heard Merkel reduced defence budget and army size from 220,000 to 180,000. Thats kinda strange as Germany has 85,000,000 people lol, 180,000 soldiers is too low for such a large country. Maybe they are using police to guard borders and support army in possible invasion. Though i dont like that, USSR did the same and its not good, NKVD had duty to guard border with the Red Army, but NKVD has its own ranks and commanders, its never good to have two armies defending same position, soldiers can get easily confused whom to listen. I guess all EU countries are using police to guard borders as their armies are too small in numbers. Or they guard borders with cameras and radars?


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Posted 25 September 2014 - 01:41 PM

There is something interesting I would like to share with you, which was posted at www.abcnews.go.com

 

After Years of Trouble, F-22 Raptor’s 1st Combat Mission a ‘Success’

 The F-22 Raptor, one of the most expensive fighters in the world, undertook and successfully completed a combat mission for the first time ever Monday in Syria.

The next generation Raptor, which has a total program price tag north of $79 billion, had sat out two wars and at least one previous smaller conflict since going operational in late 2005 before being called on to hit a single target in Syria Monday: an Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) "command and control building."

"The flight of the F-22s delivered GPS-guided munitions, precision munitions targeting only the right side of the building," Lt. Gen. William Mayville told reporters, referring to presentation slides of the operation. "And you can see that the control -- the command and control center where it was located in the building was destroyed."

 

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The stealth F-22 has had chances to fight before – during Air Force operations in Iraq and in Afghanistan as well as its role in the no-fly zone over Libya in 2011 – but in each case the Air Force said the high-tech jet was not an “operational requirement.”

The Pentagon apparently decided the U.S.-led strikes against ISIS in Syria, for which the Syrian government says it was given warning, were different.

“Basically, we look at the aircraft and the crews that we have and we make a determination on how to portion those things, based on a lot of factors: location, nature of the target, weapons that may need to be used,” Air Force Central Command Lt. Col. Tadd Sholtis told ABC News. “In this case, the F-22 was the weapon that got assigned to that particular target.”

"The mission was a success," he added.

Previously F-22 Raptors have been reportedly stationed at Al Dhafra Air Base in the United Arab Emirates, one of the Arab nations that the military said participated in the strikes against ISIS in Syria. Sholtis declined to comment on where the fighters were forward deployed for this mission, except that they were in the Gulf region.

While the Air Force had said the F-22’s advanced capabilities simply weren’t necessary for the previous conflicts, the plane also suffered from troubling issues of its own.

Most disturbing were instances in which pilots reported feeling the symptoms of oxygen deprivation while flying the high-performance machines. From 2008 to 2012 pilots reported experiencing confusion, sluggishness or disorientation – sometimes even blackouts – at the controls of the plane more than two dozen times. In one instance, a pilot because so disoriented that his plane skimmed treetops before he was able to pull up and save himself. In May 2012, two Raptor pilots told CBS News’ “60 Minutes” they were too afraid to fly the plane.

In another, more drastic case, Air Force pilot Capt. Jeff Haney died in a crash in 2010 after the oxygen system in his plane malfunctioned. After an investigation, the Air Force faulted Haney for failing to fly the plane properly while suffering a “sense similar to suffocation.” The plane’s manufacturers eventually settled a wrongful death lawsuit with the Haney family.



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Posted 01 October 2014 - 01:28 PM

Hi guys,

 

There is another flying beast that I would like to show you from http://www.militarytimes.com/.

 

F-35 'on track' for carrier tests in November

 

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The F-35 joint strike fighter is on track to conduct trials aboard a US Navy aircraft carrier in November, but there are still variables as to what may be tested, the program’s top official said today.

“The November deployment will happen,” Lt. Gen. Christopher Bogdan, the head of the F-35 joint program office, said during a news briefing in Oslo. “It will most likely happen with two airplanes. Whether both those airplanes are fully capable of doing all the work remains to be seen.”

“We have some work to do as we lead up to that point in November,” he added.

That work will decide what trials the pair of F-35C models will end up performing while aboard the US Navy’s carrier Nimitz, located off the west coast of the US. The biggest question is whether both jets can perform catapult launch and arrestment trials or if only one is ready for that.

If the latter is the case, the second jet will be left on dock for what Bogdan called “logistics testing.”

Bogdan’s comments came following the biannual JSF Executive Steering Board meeting, which brings together representatives from the F-35’s nine partner nations to discuss the fifth-generation fighter. The meeting rotates locations.

It has been a week of mixed news for the jet. On Tuesday, a government fiscal watchdog released a report stating that sustainment estimates for the F-35 may be underselling the overall cost of the program. Then on Wednesday, South Korea officially signed on as a customer for the plane, with plans to procure 40 F-35A models.

Bogdan was joined at the Oslo event by Air Force undersecretary for acquisition William LaPlante, who noted there is a “slow but steady” movement to drive sustainment costs down.

“Most of the new discussion and intellectual work today is on the sustainment and cost,” LaPlante added.

Bogdan was also asked to comment on the rising strength of the dollar and what impact that could have on program costs. While cautioning that he is not an economist, the general expressed confidence and acknowledged that there is a risk in changing global markets.

“We are very much conscious of exchange rates,” Bogdan said. “We actually have to build those into our contracts to ensure that everybody is equitably dealt with on both ends of those contractual transactions.

“With the strengthening of the dollar for certain partners and certain services, that creates what I would consider to be a risk we have to deal with,” he added. “We have to understand that risk; we have to put money aside to make sure we can handle those exchange rates and changes in the currencies.”



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Posted 21 October 2014 - 01:13 PM

Driverless Trucks Will Keep Army Safe From IEDs

U.S. Army convoys will soon be able to roll into even the roughest of unfriendly foreign urban areas and combat zones without the worry of loss of life, thanks to new technology that will make large vehicles fully autonomous.

 

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In demonstrations earlier this month at Fort Hood, Texas, the U.S. Army Tank-Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) and Lockheed Martin demonstrated the ability of the Autonomous Mobility Appliqué System (AMAS), which gives full autonomy to convoys to operate in urban environments. In tests, driverless tactical vehicles were able to navigate hazards and obstacles including pedestrians, oncoming traffic, road intersections, traffic circles and stalled and passing vehicles.

Under an initial $11 million contract in 2012, Lockheed Martin developed the multiplatform kit which integrates low-cost sensors and control systems with Army and Marine tactical vehicles to enable autonomous operation in convoys. According to Lockheed, AMAS also gives drivers an automated option to alert, stop and adjust, or take full control under user supervision.

“The AMAS CAD hardware and software performed exactly as designed, and dealt successfully with all of the real-world obstacles that a real-world convoy would encounter,” said David Simon, AMAS program manager for Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control, in a statement.

But not only do driverless convoys add a degree of safety under dangerous conditions, they also move the military closer its apparent goal of nearly total autonomous warfare.

 

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“[AMAS] adds substantial weight to the Army’s determination to get robotic systems into the hands of the warfighter,” said TARDEC technical manager Bernard Theisen.

The Pentagon has long sought options for protecting U.S. military convoys from suicide bombers, IEDs and other attacks since the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Most recently, the Afghan Taliban claimed responsibility for an attack on a U.S.-led military convoy in Kabul near Camp Eggers earlier this month, when a roadside bomb exploded but without casualties.



#14 Zandatsu

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Posted 21 October 2014 - 04:03 PM

Thats really damn cool, I can already thing of the uses in the future for SPAAGs, SPGs and even MBTs!

 

Here's a bit of (late) news, USS america was commissioned 10 days ago.


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Posted 26 November 2014 - 01:10 PM

F-35Bs No Louder than F/A-18 Super Hornets

 

Residents who live near bases where F-35s are stationed appealed to the Pentagon saying they feared the F-35 would be too loud and disturb neighborhoods.

 

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However, the Joint Strike Fighter program office released results on Oct.31 that found the F-35B is no louder than the F/A-18. The tests results were released ahead of the beginning of training for F-35B pilots at Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort, South Carolina.

The tests were done in 2013 at Edwards Air Force Base, California. Testers found that the takeoff noise made by the Marine Corps variant of the F-35 is only two decibels higher than the Super Hornet — a level of noise that the human ear would have a hard time detecting.

Conversely, the F-35B was 10 decibels quieter than the Super Hornet in flying formations or landing, according to the test results.

Of course those test results have been questioned in the past, especially in regards to the controversial decision to base F-35s in Burlington, Vermont.
 



#16 Zandatsu

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Posted 26 November 2014 - 01:38 PM

Oh look, something about the F 35 that's positive, that's a first. 


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#17 pkozukova

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Posted 05 December 2014 - 01:59 PM

Helo for German Special Forces Conducts First Flight

BERLIN — In June of 2013, the German Army ordered from Airbus Helicopters 15 new multirole helicopters for its KSK Special Forces Command. Last week, representatives from the German military watched as the EC645 T2 successfully completed its first flight at the company’s facility in Donauwörth, Bavaria.

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“This first flight is a milestone in the EC645 T2 program and we’re thrilled to be able to celebrate this event with our customer,” said Ralf Barnscheidt, head of the company’s German Military Support Center.

The lightweight helicopter is the military version of the civil EC145 T2 that went into service in July of this year. It features a Helionix digital avionics suite with full night vision and a four-axis autopilot.

The helicopter, which can be strategically airlifted in an Airbus A400M and quickly prepared for missions upon arrival in theater, closes a gap for German Special Forces Command because of its multirole capability. It can be used for a range of military operations including transportation, reconnaissance, search and rescue, fire support, and evacuation of wounded soldiers.

Delivery is slated to start at the end of 2015, said Airbus Helicopters spokesman Claas Belling.

“We are waiting for certification and military testing so there are still a number of question marks behind everything, and it doesn’t just depend on us, but it will happen at the end of 2015, that’s for sure,” he said.

Thailand is the second country to commit to the EC645 T2, having signed a deal for five aircraft to be operated by the Royal Thai Navy. But Belling said that Airbus is in talks about export activities with several other countries.

“Many of them are waiting for the first flights to see how it performs with the German Special Forces, and we have every reason to hope that it will be a success,” he said.


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#18 Zandatsu

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Posted 07 December 2014 - 09:44 PM

The Germans actually bought something for their military? It truly is the end times. 


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#19 pkozukova

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Posted 07 December 2014 - 10:34 PM

The Germans actually bought something for their military? It truly is the end times.

Yes, they did

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Posted 11 December 2014 - 03:36 PM

USS North Dakota Commissioned

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USS North Dakota (SSN 784) officially became the Navy's newest addition to the submarine force following a commissioning ceremony held Oct. 25, at Naval Submarine Base New London.

North Dakota is the 11th Virginia-class attack submarine to join the fleet, and the first of eight Block III Virginia-class submarines to be built. The Block III submarines are being built with new Virginia Payload Tubes designed to lower costs and increase missile-firing payload possibilities.

The 10 current Virginia-class submarines have 12 individual 21-inch diameter vertical launch tubes able to fire Tomahawk Land Attack Missiles (TLAMS). The Block III submarines being built will have two-larger 87-inch diameter tubes able to house six TLAMS each.

Adm. Jonathan Greenert, the 30th Chief of Naval Operations, was the ceremony's keynote speaker. He enthusiastically welcomed North Dakota to the fleet and reminded the crew of the important role they will play in protecting the nation's security while executing his standing operating orders of: Warfighting First, Operate Forward and Be Ready.

"It is with great pride that I welcome USS North Dakota to the fleet," said Greenert. "May God bless and guide this warship and all who shall sail on her. I congratulate all whose hard work and dedication brought this magnificent warship to life. On behalf of the Secretary of the Navy and for the President of the United States, I hereby place USS North Dakota in commission."

Hundreds of citizens from North Dakota, including the governor and senators, attended the commissioning ceremony.

"Today was a historic day for the people of North Dakota," said North Dakota Gov. Jack Dalrymple. "We celebrated the commissioning of this majestic submarine just days before we mark the 125th anniversary of our statehood. We are proud and honored to have this grand ship bear the name, spirit and heritage of our great state."

As the most modern and sophisticated attack submarine in the world, the submarine can operate in both littoral and deep ocean environments and presents combatant commanders with a broad and unique range of operational capabilities. North Dakota will be a flexible, multi-mission platform designed to carry out the seven core competencies of the submarine force: anti-submarine warfare, anti-surface warfare, delivery of special operations forces, strike warfare, irregular warfare, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance and mine warfare.

"From the Arabian Sea to the Polar Ice cap, North Dakota will operate undetected in the harshest environments on the planet as her crew protects the freedom of the seas and the interests of the United States," said Vice Adm. Michael Connor, Commander, Submarine Forces. "Leaders around the world around the world continue to ask for more American submarine presence, because they realize that there are some very important things that must be done that only submarines can do. To the crew of North Dakota, you have done a fantastic job in bringing this ship to life. Now it time to shift your focus to global operations and get ready to meet your new responsibilities on patrol far from home."

The submarine is 377 feet long, has a 34-foot beam, and will be able to dive to depths greater than 800 feet and operate at speeds in excess of 25 knots submerged. It will operate for 33 years without ever refueling.

Capt. Douglas Gordon is North Dakota's first commanding officer. He leads a crew of about 136 officers and enlisted personnel. While born in Indianapolis, Indiana, he refers to Carrollton, Georgia, as home. He enlisted in the Navy and attended Nuclear Power School prior to being released from active duty to attend Auburn University on an NROTC scholarship. Gordon graduated from Auburn University in 1991 with a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering.

"The crew has been looking forward to commissioning from day one of their arrival," said Gordon. "Since we first began manning the ship in October 2011 our crew has progressed through numerous milestones which has culminated in our commissioning,' said Gordon. "For the first time the ship got underway for sea trials in August, and this sea time permitted the crew their first opportunity to finally see how their hard work and preparation had paid off,"

"I know they are all as thrilled as I am in commissioning North Dakota, joining the fleet and eventually deploying," said Gordon. "We will operate the ship at sea over the next nine months or so while conducting training, trials, certifications, and testing. Following a post-shakedown availability, the North Dakota will begin a normal operations cycle for working towards its first deployment."

Ironically the only native North Dakotan assigned to the submarine is the ship's senior enlisted advisor or chief of the boat, Master Chief Electronics Technician (Submarines/Diver) Timothy Preabt.

He grew up in Williston, N.D., but moved to Mandan, N.D., and graduated from Mandan High School in 1989.

"As a native of North Dakota and the only member of the crew from North Dakota, it is a great honor and privilege to be part of the North Dakota," said Preabt. "The outreach of support received from the great people at home has been overwhelming. North Dakota was a great place to grow up and I have always been proud of my home state, but nothing made me more prouder to see the individual pride that the people of North Dakota have for their ship,"

"The crew of North Dakota has worked together ensuring we were ready to operate the Navy's newest Virginia-class submarine. Taking this fine warship to sea and operating it was a testament for their hard work, training and preparation during the last three years'" said Preabt. "The USS North Dakota will always be a great submarine because she started out that way - thanks to the Sailors that brought her to life!"

Katie Fowler, wife of retired Vice Adm. Jeffrey L. "Jeff" Fowler, a native of Bismarck, N.D., serves as the submarine's sponsor. She broke the traditional champagne bottle against the boat's sail during the christening ceremony in November 2013.

Virginia-class submarines are built under a unique teaming arrangement between General Dynamics Electric Boat in Groton, Conn., and Huntington Ingalls Industries in Newport News, Virginia.

Construction on North Dakota began March 2009; the submarine's keel was authenticated during a ceremony on May 11, 2012; and the submarine was christened during a ceremony Nov. 2, 2013.

North Dakota is the second Navy ship, and first submarine, to be named in honor of the people of "The Peace Garden State." The other ship was the Delaware-class battleship BB-29, which was commissioned April 11, 1910 and decommissioned Nov. 22, 1923.







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